The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware
The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware

Who loves a good thriller, suspense, mystery story? Ruth Ware delivers such a story in The Turn of the Key. Many have described the book as a modernized The Turn of the Screws by Henry James. Rowan is hired as a live-in nanny only to discover all things aren’t what they seem. The children, while polite and seemingly well-adjusted at the interview, prove to be almost more than Rowan can handle. The parents are workaholics and are out of tune with all things related to home. Then there is the housekeeper and gardener who bring their own complex characteristics to the story. The house is a techy person’s dream, but for the average person, being under constant surveillance could and does become unsettling. Rowan finds herself in prison and writes to a lawyer to plead her case. She admits she made mistakes and is not who she claimed to be, but maintains her innocence in the murder of one of the little girls. Even after you have read the book, there are so many questions that come to mind. While I felt the book started slowly, it had twists and turns and a conclusion that made it all worthwhile.

Your pal, Dewey